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White Steam 1900-1911

Description; Pressed brass threaded hubcap for a 1910 White Steam automobile built in Cleveland, Ohio. In 1911 they started building gasoline powered automobiles.
• Size; The cap has an outside diameter at the shoulder of about 3 ¼” (82mm) and is 1.399” (36mm) high and 2 ½” (64mm) at the sextant with about external threads of 2.851” (72mm).
• Weight: 8 oz ( 228 gms)


Premier_NPPS_1_A.jpg RR_NPPB_1_A.jpg White_Steam_PB_1_A.jpg Winton_NPPB_1_A_1912.jpg ajax_PA_1_A_1925-6.gif
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File information
Filename:White_Steam_PB_1_A.jpg
Album name:hubcapco / Hubcaps
Filesize:26 KiB
Date added:Jun 30, 2007
Dimensions:392 x 396 pixels
Displayed:145 times
URL:http://hubcapcollector.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pid=329
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Frank   [Aug 01, 2007 at 09:05 PM]
White Sewing Machine Company was a manufacturer of Brass Era automobiles in Cleveland, Ohio. The company also produced bicycles, roller skates, automatic lathes, and sewing machines. Auto production was handled by founder Thomas White's son, Rollin. At first, Rollin H. White's steam-powered cars were sold under the Rollin Motors brand, with another company, Cleveland Tractor, producing a steam-powered tractor. However, the White name eventually became associated with automobiles, lasting in auto-related proproduction through 1981.
The 1904 White was a touring car model. Equipped with a tonneau, it could seat 4 passengers and sold for US$2500. The vertical compound 2-cylinder steam engine, situated at the front of the car, produced 10 hp (7.5 kW). The steel-framed car weighed 1650 lb (748 kg). Throttle control was equipped, a novelty at the time.
By the teen years, White switched to making gasoline powered trucks. White was successful with their heavy machines which saw service the world over with the First World War. White remained in the truck industry for decades.

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